The biggest losers of Australia’s ongoing lockdowns are revealed

From gyms in New South Wales to interstate travel in Queensland: Australia’s biggest lockdown losers are revealed – here’s how your state has fared

  • Australia has begun to enjoy a ‘new normal’ after easing coronavirus restrictions 
  • Federal Government created a three-step plan to ease COVID-19 measures 
  • States and territories can implement changes to the rules at their own timing 
  • Fitness, tourism and entertainment industry have taken a hit due to health crisis 
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

Australia has begun to enjoy a ‘new normal’ after easing social distancing restrictions implemented to control the coronavirus outbreak.

States and territories have once again allowed their residents to hit the beach and eat out after working hard to successfully flatten the curve. 

But restrictions have not been eased consistently across the whole country or throughout all industries. 

There are mixed messages about what is deemed safe, with the fitness, entertainment, beauty and tourism industries suffering the most.

The Federal Government created a three-step plan to ease coronavirus restrictions over the coming months but the exact rules and timing of them will be decided by state and territory governments.  

Here, Daily Mail Australia explores the biggest losers of the nation’s lockdown in each state.   

Events with hundreds or thousands of revellers like festival (pictured) are off the cards indefinitely. Stage-three of the Federal Government's plan to ease restrictions allows gatherings of up to 100 people

Events with hundreds or thousands of revellers like festival (pictured) are off the cards indefinitely. Stage-three of the Federal Government’s plan to ease restrictions allows gatherings of up to 100 people

PUBS

Pubs have opened across the country but they are required to follow a strict set of rules. 

Up to 50 people will be able to dine in restaurants, pubs and cafes in NSW from June 1, up from 10 currently. 

But the new freedom comes with greater responsibility for publicans and customers to ensure there are no COVID-19 outbreaks. 

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian suggested the days of ordering a beer at the bar and standing around for a catch-up chat are likely a thing of the past.

Pubgoers will not be allowed to stand up or mingle and they are required to order while seated at a table.    

The eased restrictions are also subject to a one person per four square metre rule, meaning smaller pubs will not be allowed to host the maximum 50 people.  

Pictured: Customers dine at the Rio in Summer Hill, Sydney, on Friday May 15 as NSW eases their restrictions

Pictured: Customers dine at the Rio in Summer Hill, Sydney, on Friday May 15 as NSW eases their restrictions

Victoria will allow 20 people in restaurants, cafes and pubs from June 1. It will be increased to 50 from June 22 and 100 in late July. 

From Friday May 15, Queensland allowed 10 people at a time to dine at restaurants, cafes, pubs, registered and licensed clubs, RSL clubs and hotels.    

South Australia allows seated alcohol service with up to 10 customers indoors and 10 outdoors. Stage-two of easing restrictions has been brought forward to June 1 and up to 80 people will be allowed in large hospitality venues.

In Western Australia, cafes, pubs and restaurants may seat up to 20 patrons. Further easing of restrictions are expected on June 8. 

Tasmania allowed restaurants, cafes and pubs to seat 10 customers at a time from Monday. 

The Northern Territory opened pubs on May 15. But unlike other states, there are no restrictions on how many people can be allowed into a venue, with officials simply imposing a two-hour limit. 

The conditions placed on pubs as restrictions continue to ease are a world away from the venues before coronavirus. The return date for nightclubs and social gatherings with hundreds of revellers is even more blurry.  

Pubs are required to follow strict social distancing guidelines and limit how many revellers enter the venue at once

Pubs are required to follow strict social distancing guidelines and limit how many revellers enter the venue at once 

ENTERTAINMENT AND AMUSEMENT VENUES 

Events with hundreds of revellers are off the cards indefinitely, hitting the country’s arts and entertainment industries hard.

The final step of the government’s plan is capped at gatherings of 100 people, meaning there is no indication about the return of mass gatherings.

Mass gatherings could include anything from festivals and music gigs to attending sporting matches as a spectator. 

Step-two recommends the reopening of indoor movie theatres, concert venues, stadiums, galleries, museums and zoos with up to 20 patrons.

These venues typically attract hundreds and even thousands of guests at once. 

By step-three the listed venues could have up to 100 guests.   

NSW and Victoria are the only two states who did not shut their borders during the health crisis. Pictured: Barriers are seen installed at Miles Street in Coolangatta on the Gold Coast

NSW and Victoria are the only two states who did not shut their borders during the health crisis. Pictured: Barriers are seen installed at Miles Street in Coolangatta on the Gold Coast

TOURISM

The Federal Government’s framework states that interstate travel should be allowed by phase-three but the return of domestic travel has been a point of contention for state and territory leaders.

The ACT, NSW and Victoria kept their borders open throughout the health crisis, but banned residents from travelling.  

Queensland, Western Australia, the Northern Territory, South Australia and Tasmania decided to shut off from the rest of the country and their borders remain closed.   

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk warned her state’s borders could remain shut until at least September.

The decision sparked a fiery political debate, with Ms Berejiklian calling Ms Palaszczuk’s decision to keep Queensland’s borders closed ‘ridiculous’.   

It's hoped Australians will be allowed to travel domestically to support the national economy

It’s hoped Australians will be allowed to travel domestically to support the national economy

IS YOUR BORDER OPEN?

New South Wales: Yes. Residents will be able to take a holiday anywhere in NSW on June 1.

Queensland: No. The premier has warned it could remain shut until September. 

Victoria: Yes. Residents will be allowed to stay in a holiday home or tourist accommodation including caravan parks and camping grounds from June 1.

South Australia:  No. South Australia will implement stage-two on June 1 but said state border restrictions was a future step for consideration 

Tasmania: No.  Tasmania will move to stage-three of their restrictions on July 13 and border controls will remain in place

ACT: Yes

Western Australia: No. Inter-state border is expected to be the final restriction lifted. 

Northern Territory:  No. The Northern Territory is yet to reveal when border restrictions could be relaxed

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On Wednesday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison challenged the Liberal premiers in Tasmania and South Australia over their justifications on keeping their borders closed.

Mr Morrison has previously limited his criticism to Labor leaders in Queensland and Western Australia but has now broadened his scope.

‘The expert medical advice at a national level never recommended internal borders within Australia and it’s not good for the economy, particularly as we go into this next school holiday season,’ he told Sky News on Wednesday.

‘Tourism businesses need that support.

‘So those individual states, they’ll have to justify those decisions themselves because it wasn’t something that came out of national cabinet.’

Tourism Minister Simon Birmingham has called on states with closed borders to release their scientific advice. 

Western Australia has indicated their interstate border would be the final restriction lifted in their four-phase plan. They are currently in phase-two and phase-four is ‘to be confirmed’.  

Tasmania will move to stage-three of their restrictions on July 13 and border controls will remain in place. 

South Australia will implement stage-two on June 1 but said state border restrictions was a future step for consideration. 

The Northern Territory is yet to reveal when border restrictions could be relaxed.  

While NSW’s borders remain open, the state will only ease rules on intrastate travel from June 1. Residents will be allowed to holiday anywhere in NSW. 

Victoria will also relax their rules on June 1, allowing residents to stay in a holiday home or tourist accommodation including caravan parks and camping grounds.  

Those looking for a pamper at a beauty salon in Australia's two biggest states - Victoria and NSW - will be able to receive their treatment on June 1

 Those looking for a pamper at a beauty salon in Australia’s two biggest states – Victoria and NSW – will be able to receive their treatment on June 1

BEAUTY

Beauty therapy, with strict social distancing rules, has been given the green light in all states and territories except for Western Australia.

BEAUTY THERAPY IN YOUR STATE 

New South Wales: June 1

Queensland: May 15

Victoria: June 1

South Australia: June 1   

Tasmania: June 15

ACT: May 29

Western Australia: Phase 3 – To be finalised in coming weeks

Northern Territory:  May 15

Those looking for a pamper in Australia’s two biggest states – Victoria and NSW – will be able to receive their treatment on June 1, while Tasmania will follow on June 15.

Victoria has also approved tattoo parlours to return to business but NSW has left the artists in the dark.

Gareth Parry, Australian Tattooist Guild’s NSW representative, said there was a lack of consistency with the easing of rules, The Daily Telegraph reported.

‘We want to ensure that the tattoo industry is not left behind when it comes to these decisions, some states appear to be including the tattoo industry in a progressive way while others are not,’ he said. 

Vice President of the Australian Tattooists Guild Tashi Edwards said a majority of tattoo artists were sole traders and some had struggled to get commercial rent deductions during the pandemic. 

Western Australia is currently in phase-two of their coronavirus restrictions and will allow beauty therapy in phase-three. 

The Northern Territory and Queensland moved allowed beauty salons to open on May 15.   

Gyms across the NSW remain closed and the government has not provided a clear timeline on when they could be opened - despite all other states and territories moving to do so (stock image)

Gyms across the NSW remain closed and the government has not provided a clear timeline on when they could be opened – despite all other states and territories moving to do so (stock image)

GYMS  

Gyms across the NSW remain closed and the government has not provided a clear timeline on when they could be opened – despite all other states and territories moving to do so. 

WHEN GYMS WILL OPEN IN YOUR STATE

All gyms will be initially open subject to social distancing limits and/or restrictions on numbers which may vary in your state

New South Wales: No date set

Queensland: Expected on June 13 with up to 20 patrons at a time

Victoria: June 22

South Australia: June 1

Tasmania: June 15

ACT: May 29

Western Australia: Opened on May 18

Northern Territory: Opened on May 15  

Premier Gladys Berejiklian on Monday said gyms won’t open in the ‘foreseeable future’ due to their ‘health risk’.

Gym owners and fitness fanatics have slammed NSW for loosening the COVID-19 restrictions on pubs, restaurants, cafes and beauty salons ahead of gyms, which provide health benefits. 

Gyms, pools and other fitness centres fall into stage two of the Federal Government’s three-step plan to restart Australia.

In the Northern Territory they reopened on May 15 – the same day as pubs and cafes – and in Western Australia on May 18.

The ACT announced they will ease measures on May 29, while Victoria and South Australia plan to lift fitness restrictions on June 1. 

Tasmania has indicated they will follow suit on June 15.

All gyms are subject to social distancing limits and restrictions on numbers which vary depending on the state or territory.     

EASING OF RESTRICTIONS ACROSS AUSTRALIA 

NSW

* Up to 50 people will be able to dine in restaurants, pubs and cafes from June 1, up from 10 currently.

* Beauty salons can reopen from June 1 with no more than 10 clients at any one time practising social distancing.

* Outdoor gatherings allowed for a maximum of 10 people.

* Public school students are back full time.

* Regional travel within NSW permitted from June 1, when museums, galleries, libraries, zoos and aquariums, can reopen. 

VICTORIA

* Victorians can have up to five visitors in their homes.

* Gathering limits relaxed to 10 for outdoor activities including fishing, hiking and golf.

* From June 1, the maximum of wedding guests will rise from 10 to 20, with up to 50 at outdoor funerals. A limit of 20 people will be allowed at indoor and outdoor gatherings, swimming pools, beauty and personal care services, libraries and other community facilities.

* Also from June 1, 20 people allowed in restaurants, cafes and pubs, increasing to 50 from June 22 and 100 in late July.

* Overnight stays in hotels permitted from June.

* Children in Prep to Year 2 and Years 11 and 12 are back with the rest to return from June 9.

* Year 11 and 12 students will sit exams from November 9 to December 2. 

QUEENSLAND

* Public school students have resumed full-time classes.

* Shopping for non-essential items permitted and up to five members of one household can visit other homes.

* Up to 10 people allowed to congregate in parks, pools and playgrounds.

* Queenslanders can travel up to 250km from their homes.

* Borders remain closed. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

* Dining and drinking at cafes and restaurants allowed, currently with up to 10 customers indoors and 10 outdoors.

* Stage two easing of restrictions brought forward to June 1 to allow up to 50 people to attend funerals, up to 80 in large hospitality venues and up to 20 people in cinemas, theatres, museums, beauty salons, gyms and indoor fitness centres.

* Students are already back in school full time.

* Some border restrictions apply. 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

* WA to reopen almost all intrastate borders on Friday except for the Kimberley, parts of the East Pilbara and the Shire of Ngaanyatjarraku to protect vulnerable indigenous communities.

* Cafes, pubs and restaurants may seat up to 20 patrons.

* Further easing of restrictions expected on June 8.

* Students are already back in school full time.

* Borders remain closed to interstate travellers. 

TASMANIA

* Indoor and outdoor gatherings of 10 people allowed, including real estate, religious and wedding events.

* Restaurants and cafes can seat 10 at a time.

* Funerals can have 30 mourners outdoors.

* Kindergarten to Year Six students and Years 11 and 12 are back in school with the remainder to return on June 9.

* Racing events expected to resume on June 13.

* Border remains closed. 

NORTHERN TERRITORY

* The NT has relaxed restrictions on parks, golf, fishing and swimming.

* Restaurants and bars can reopen with a two-hour limit, with entertainment venues to come.

* Restricted access to indigenous communities remains in place until at least June 18.

* Students already back in school full time.

* Borders remain closed. 

ACT

* Outdoor gatherings of up to 10 people allowed. Restrictions on sport and recreation eased.

* Large clubs will be allowed more than 150 people from Saturday, with a limit of 20 patrons in each room.

* Choirs, bands and orchestras will also be allowed to resume practice and national institutions can open their doors to 20 people at a time.

* Students in Years 3, 4 and 10 back in classrooms. Years 5, 6, 8 and 9 to return on June 2.

SOURCE: AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS 

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