McEnany accuses Big Tech of being ‘reluctant’ to go after posts from Chinese officials despite targeting Trump

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany accused Big Tech of being quick to “censor” President Trump but “reluctant” to label misinformation from Chinese officials.

“This is bias in action,” McEnany said at a press briefing on Thursday, after Twitter added a “get the facts” link to a Trump tweet about absentee voting on Wednesday. McEnany also pointed to Twitter’s “manipulated media” warning on a tweet by White House adviser Dan Scavino “for posting a video that played a verbatim clip.”

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“So they appear to be very hastily eager to censor President Trump… but reluctant when it comes to China,” said the press secretary.

On Tuesday, Trump wrote: “There is NO WAY (ZERO!) that Mail-In Ballots will be anything less than substantially fraudulent. Mail boxes will be robbed, ballots will be forged & even illegally printed out & fraudulently signed. The Governor of California is sending Ballots to millions of people, anyone living in the state, no matter who they are or how they got there, will get one. That will be followed up with professionals telling all of these people, many of whom have never even thought of voting before, how, and for whom, to vote. This will be a Rigged Election. No way!!”

Within hours, Twitter then appended a label to the bottom of the tweet reading, “Get the facts about mail-in ballots,” which said the claims were unsubstantiated.

McEnany said that Google had created a search engine for the Chinese Communist Party to blacklist human rights searches and allow for easy surveillance.

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In 2018, Google built a censored search engine for China that linked users’ searches to their personal phone numbers. Google compiled a censorship blacklist for the search engine, codenamed Dragonfly, with terms including  “human rights,” “student protest” and “Nobel Prize” in Mandarin, according to details of the plan obtained by The Intercept. 

“Facebook and Twitter have both taken paid advertising that spread disinformation about China’s mass imprisonment of religious minorities and Twitter has allowed Chinese officials to use its platforms to spread misinformation about coronavirus, undermine the pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong and more,” McEnany continued.

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She noted that in March a Chinese official began pushing a rumor on Twitter that the U.S. military was responsible for the spread of coronavirus. “It took all the way until today when we raised concerns about it [the tweet] to get a fact check.”